Diverticulitis -  Treatment

Given that Diverticulitis is known as a western disease, it can be no surprise that diet is largely blamed for the high number of cases in the western world.

We can not state strongly enough that enjoying a wonderfully balanced diet with plenty of whole food could help you avoid the pain and discomfort of Diverticulitis.  It is does not guarantee prevention of the condition, however it is believed to give you a far greater chance of avoiding the condition.

If you are unfortunate enough to have already contracted the condition we have included an article from ‘Medicinenet.com’ below, which offers an insight into the medical treatments for Diverticulitis.


Medical treatment of diverticulitis and diverticulosis

Most patients with diverticulosis have minimal or no symptoms, and do not require any specific treatment. A normal fiber diet is advisable to prevent constipation and perhaps prevent the formation of more diverticula.

Patients with mild symptoms of abdominal pain due to muscular spasm in the area of the diverticula may benefit from anti-spasmodic drugs such as:

When diverticulitis occurs, antibiotics usually are needed. Oral antibiotics are sufficient when symptoms are mild. Some examples of commonly prescribed antibiotics include:

Liquid or low fiber foods are advised during acute attacks of diverticulitis. This is done to reduce the amount of material that passes through the colon, which at least theoretically, may aggravate the diverticulitis. In severe diverticulitis with high fever and pain, patients are hospitalized and given intravenous antibiotics. Surgery is needed for patients with persistent bowel obstruction or abscess not responding to antibiotics.

Surgical treatment for diverticulitis

Diverticulitis that does not respond to medical treatment requires surgical intervention. Surgery usually involves drainage of any collections of pus and resection (surgical removal) of the segment of the colon containing the diverticula, usually the sigmoid colon. Surgical removal of the bleeding diverticulum also is necessary for those with persistent bleeding. In patients needing surgery to stop persistent bleeding, it is important to determine exactly where the bleeding is coming from in order to guide the surgeon.

Sometimes, diverticula can erode into the adjacent urinary bladder, causing severe recurrent urine infection and passage of gas during urination. This situation also requires surgery.

Sometimes, surgery may be suggested for patients with frequent, recurrent attacks of diverticulitis leading to multiple courses of antibiotics, hospitalizations, and days lost from work. During surgery, the goal is to remove all, or almost all, of the colon containing diverticula in order to prevent future episodes of diverticulitis. There are few long-term consequences of resection of the sigmoid colon for diverticulitis, and the surgery often can be done laparoscopically, which limits post operative pain and time for recovery.

What can be done to prevent diverticulitis and diverticulosis?

Once formed, diverticula are permanent. No treatment has been found to prevent complications of diverticular disease.

Diets high in fiber increases stool bulk and prevents constipation, and theoretically may help prevent further diverticular formation or worsening of the diverticular condition. Some doctors recommend avoiding nuts, corn, and seeds which can plug diverticular openings and cause diverticulitis, but there is little evidence to support this recommendation.

Because inflammation has been found at the edges of diverticula, it has been speculated that colonic bacteria may be playing a role in the rupture of diverticula by promoting inflammation. This has led some people to further speculate that changing the bacteria in the colon might reduce inflammation and rupture and to suggest treatment with probiotics; however, there is not enough evidence of a benefit of probiotics yet to recommend treatment with probiotics of patients with diverticular disease.

http://www.medicinenet.com/diverticulosis/page5.htm



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Diverticulitis Treatment

This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the IBS-Health.com., the author nor publisher take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.