It is highly recommended that anyone who suffers IBS, undergo an elimination diet.  This is a very simple process, however it can be wonderfully revealing.  The nature and variation of a modern diet makes it incredibly hard to pinpoint which foods trigger our IBS symptoms.

An elimination diet will give you accurate information, as opposed to the supposition that most of make our decisions upon.  It is very common to give up wheat and dairy at the moment, however it is very important to asses whether this is the case in the first instance.

It is very easy to equate symptoms to food incorrectly, and to assume that your symptoms are being caused by a food stuff that you are suspicious of as opposed to the one that is actually harming you.  We have included a guide to the process from WedMD below:

IBS Elimination Diets

Personal diet tip

Personal Diet Tip IBS Elimination Diets

The Elimination Diet

This method for figuring out possible food allergy takes time -- several weeks. It’s not a good idea for people who have had severe allergic reactions or anaphylaxis. If you have, it is important for you to find out your trigger food as soon as possible so you can avoid it. Talk with your doctor.

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How does the elimination diet work?

The elimination diet involves removing specific foods or ingredients from your diet because you and your doctor think they may be causing allergy symptoms. Common allergy-causing foods include milk, eggs, nuts, wheat, and soy. Your doctor will supervise this diet over a few weeks. There are usually several steps to this diet.

1. Stop eating suspicious foods.

During this time, you will need to:

Carefully read food labels and ask how foods are prepared at restaurants so you can be sure to avoid possible triggers.

Keep a food diary to record the foods you are eating.

If you remove a certain food and the allergy symptoms go away while following this diet, your doctor can usually confirm that that food may be the cause of your problems.

While on this diet, make sure you eat other foods that provide the same nutrients as those you're avoiding. (For example, try tofu-based foods instead of dairy products.) A dietitian can help you plan meals.

2. Slowly add back in suspicious foods, one at a time.

After eliminating or taking foods out of your diet, your doctor will ask you to gradually reintroduce into your diet the foods you were avoiding. You’ll add them one at a time over time. This process helps link allergy symptoms to specific foods.

Carefully record any allergy symptoms that you get as you add each food back in. If symptoms return after eating a food, your doctor can usually confirm that this is a trigger.

3. Last, you will be asked to once again to stop eating the foods (one at a time) that you and your doctor think are causing your allergy symptoms. The list should be smaller this time. The goal is to see if the symptoms clear up for good.

The elimination diet is not a sure thing. Other factors can affect the results. For example, if you think you're sensitive to a food, you could have a response to it, but it may not be a true allergy.

Before making big changes in your diet, always talk to your doctor. If you randomly remove foods from your diet, you may not have a balanced diet -- and that can cause other health problems. You may also become frustrated because it may seem that everything you eat is causing a reaction.


Taken from Wedmd.com