Coping with Low Self Esteem

Healthy sleep can pay a huge role in tackling IBS.  Healthy sleep has a plethora of benefits as shown below.  One of the key benefits of healthy sleep patterns is the ability to deal with stress.

Stress is of course a major contributory to IBS, and your chances of dealing with it are diminished if you fail to get sufficient sleep.

It is not just the fight against stress, which is aided by good sleep.  Most important of all, your general health and prospects of a long and happy existence are greatly aided by sleep.

It makes it all the more surprising that sleep is often neglected from many treatments for IBS.  If you take note of the effects of poor sleep on your digestive system you will see a clear and present link to your symptoms.  Over the next two pages we look at the benefits of sleep, along with some facts and myths.

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IBS Anxiety

IBS Sleep

IBS - Sleep

Tips to help deal with Low Self Esteem

Improve Memory

Your mind is surprisingly busy while you snooze. During sleep you can strengthen memories or “practice” skills learned while you were awake (it’s a process called consolidation).  “If you are trying to learn something, whether it’s physical or mental, you learn it to a certain point with practice,” says Dr. Rapoport, who is an associate professor at NYU Langone Medical Center. “But something happens while you sleep that makes you learn it better.”

In other words if you’re trying to learn something new—whether it’s Spanish or a new tennis swing—you’ll perform better after sleeping.

Live Longer

Too much or too little sleep is associated with a shorter lifespan—although it’s not clear if it’s a cause or effect. (Illnesses may affect sleep patterns too.) In a 2010 study of women ages 50 to 79, more deaths occurred in women who got less than five hours or more than six and a half hours of sleep per night.

Sleep also affects quality of life.

“Many things that we take for granted are affected by sleep,” says Raymonde Jean, MD, director of sleep medicine and associate director of critical care at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York City. “If you sleep better, you can certainly live better. It’s pretty clear.”

Improve Athletic Performance

If you’re an athlete, there may be one simple way to improve your performance: sleep.

A Stanford University study found that college football players who tried to sleep at least 10 hours a night for seven to eight weeks improved their average sprint time and had less daytime fatigue and more stamina. The results of this study reflect previous findings seen in tennis players and swimmers.

Healthy Weight

If you are thinking about going on a diet, you might want to plan an earlier bedtime too.

Researchers at the University of Chicago found that dieters who were well rested lost more fat—56% of their weight loss—than those who were sleep deprived, who lost more muscle mass. (They shed similar amounts of total weight regardless of sleep.)

Dieters in the study also felt more hungry when they got less sleep.

“Sleep and metabolism are controlled by the same sectors of the brain,” Dr. Rapoport says. “When you are sleepy, certain hormones go up in your blood, and those same hormones drive appetite.”

Lower Stress

When it comes to our health stress and sleep are nearly one and the same—and both can affect cardiovascular health.

“Sleep can definitely reduce levels of stress, and with that people can have better control of their blood pressure,” Dr. Jean says. “It’s also believed that sleep effects cholesterol levels, which plays a significant role in heart disease.”


Courtesy www.health.com